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ESL 091 Salonga: Websites

Marine Plastic

Smithsonian Ocean PortalThe Ocean Portal is part of the Smithsonian Institution’s Ocean Initiative. Together with the National Museum of Natural History’s Sant Ocean Hall and the Sant Marine Ocean Chair, the Ocean Portal supports the Smithsonian’s mission to increase the public’s understanding and stewardship of the Ocean.

Center for Biological Diversity - The Center for Biological Diversity uses science, law and creative media, to focus on protecting the lands, waters and climate that species need to survive.

Ocean Unite - Ocean Unite amplifies crucial ocean messages to decision-makers in support of highly protecting at least 30 per cent of the ocean by 2030 and building ocean resilience.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administrationthe NOAA Marine Debris Program is to investigate and prevent the adverse impacts of marine debris.

National Ocean ServiceThe National Ocean Service provides data, tools, and services that support coastal economies and their contribution to the national economy.

Colonizing Mars

NASA Mars Exploration ProgramNASA’s Mars Exploration Program is a science-driven, technology-enabled study of Mars as a planetary system in order to understand the future exploration of Mars by humans.

Mars OneMars One aims to establish a permanent human settlement on Mars.

SpaceX - SpaceX designs, manufactures and launches advanced rockets and spacecraft. The company was founded in 2002 to revolutionize space technology, with the ultimate goal of enabling people to live on other planets.

Space.comSpace.com is the premier source of space exploration, innovation and astronomy news, chronicling (and celebrating) humanity's ongoing expansion across the final frontier.

NASA SpaceflightBreaking exclusive space flight related news stories and features, NASASpaceFlight.com is dedicated to expanding the public’s awareness and respect for the space flight industry, which in turn is reflected in the many space industry visitors to the site, ranging from NASA to the commercial space flight arena, plus the international launch industry.

Evaluating web resources

Find an interesting website using Google or another browser? Not sure if you can use it for academic research? It is not always easy to determine if information on the World Wide Web is credible. However, the guidelines below will help you understand clues about the reliability of web resources.

 Authority      

  • Who is the author of this page?
  • What are their credentials?
  • Are they affiliated with an institution?
  • Does the site display this information?

Objectivity    

  • What is the purpose of this page?
  • Does the author state the goals for this site?
  • Does the content inform, educate, persuade, or rant?
  • If the author is affiliated with an institution (government, university, business, etc.), does this affiliation bias the information presented?

 Accuracy      

  • Does the site have page sloppy layout, include misspellings or typos?
  • It's always a good idea to cross-reference information no matter where you find it.
  • Do graphics add or detract from the content? Is there inflammatory content?
  • Is the information complete or fragmented?

 Currency      

  • When was this page created?  Is there a revision/creation date?
  • Do the links work?
  • Is the page maintained and up-to-date?

For more in-depth information on evaluating websites, see: Evaluating Web Pages: Techniques to Apply & Questions to Ask from UC Berkeley - Teaching Library Internet Workshops